Nutritional Evaluation Of Three Common Grasses As Alternative Energy Sources In Broiler Diet

OKEREKE IHEOMA HELEN | 1 page (34994 words) | Projects / Dissertations

ABSTRACT

Four studies were carried out to evaluate three grasses (Gamba, Elephant and Guinea) as alternative feed resource for broiler chickens. Nutrient composition and anti-nutritional factors of the various grasses were evaluated in experiment I. In experiment II, the true metabolizable energy of the three grasses were respectively determined. Experiment III, Gamba, Elephant and Guinea grass meals were incorporated into diets at 10% inclusion level. In experiment IV, graded level of elephant grass meal were incorporated into broiler diet.  One hundred and twenty (120) day old Abor Acre strain of broiler chickens were used in experiment III and IV respectively. The birds were randomly assigned to 4 treatment diets, replicated into 3 with 10 (ten) birds per replicate in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD). Each of the experiments lasted for eight weeks. There were significant differences (P<0.05) among various grasses for all the parameters considered in experiment I. The crude protein was least in Gamba grass meal (14.73) and best in Elephant grass meal (19.23). The Gamba grass meal had the highest (P<0.05) gross energy of 3.93kcal/g, followed by Elephant grass meal 3.88kcal/kg. The ash was least in Guinea grass meal (6.07) and best in Elephant grass meal (8.66). The Gamba grass meal had the best content of Phosphorus (0.41%), magnesium (0.32%) and Guinea grass meal had the highest value for potassium (0.82%), while Elephant grass meal had the best value for sodium (0.29%). Elephant grass meal was significantly (P<0.05) superior in Iron, Zinc and manganese, while Guinea grass meal had the best significant (P<0.05) value for copper. All the anti-nutritional factors measured were at tolerable level to broiler chickens. In experiment II Gamba grass meal had the highest (P<0.05) true metabolisable energy of 3.91 kcal/kg, followed by Elephant grass meal (3.86). In experiment III, the growth performance of birds on dietIII compared (P>0.05) with birds on dietI (control diet). The carcass characteristics of birds fed dietIII also compared (P>0.05) with values for live weight, bled weight, de-feathered weight and dressed weight of the control dietI. On blood constituents, broiler fed dietIV had the lowest value in red blood cell (RBC) (2.18 x 106 lµl) count, which indirectly increased the value of the MCV. Biochemical indices showed significant differences (P<0.05) for total protein and globulin. Broilers fed dietIII compared favourably with broilers fed dietI in terms of cost of feed consumed, cost of production, revenue and gross margin. There were increase in size of the gizzard, small intestine, large intestine and proventriculus of broilers fed dietII, dietIII and dietIV as compared to broilers fed dietI but reduced in the abdominal fat of broilers fed dietII, dietIII and dietIV. In the histopatological test, the grasses showed no detrimental effect on the broilers fed diets DI, DII, DIII and DIV.  In experiment IV, broilers on dietII compared (P>0.05) with those fed dietI in growth performance, carcass characteristics and organ proportion. The MCV of broilers fed diet DII compared (P>0.05) with the broilers fed dietI in haematological parameters. There were significant (P<0.05) differences in some of the serum indices. Broilers fed dietII was statistically (P>0.05) similar with broilers fed dietI in the total protein, albumin, globulin and creatinine. The cost per kilogram weight gain, cost of production, revenue and gross margin of broiler fed dietII were statistically (P>0.05) similar to the control dietI. Broilers fed diets DII, DIII and DIV which in various inclusion levels of elephant grass meal had heavier weights for heart, liver, gizzard, large intestine, proventriculus, crop and pancrease as compared to broilers fed dietI but reduced abdominal fat. From the reports above, it could be concluded that Elephant grass meal can partially replace maize at 10% inclusion (DietII) to give an optimal performance for broiler chicken.

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APA

OKEREKE, H (2022). Nutritional Evaluation Of Three Common Grasses As Alternative Energy Sources In Broiler Diet. Repository.mouau.edu.ng: Retrieved Nov 26, 2022, from https://repository.mouau.edu.ng/work/view/nutritional-evaluation-of-three-common-grasses-as-alternative-energy-sources-in-broiler-diet-7-2

MLA 8th

HELEN, OKEREKE. "Nutritional Evaluation Of Three Common Grasses As Alternative Energy Sources In Broiler Diet" Repository.mouau.edu.ng. Repository.mouau.edu.ng, 18 Mar. 2022, https://repository.mouau.edu.ng/work/view/nutritional-evaluation-of-three-common-grasses-as-alternative-energy-sources-in-broiler-diet-7-2. Accessed 26 Nov. 2022.

MLA7

HELEN, OKEREKE. "Nutritional Evaluation Of Three Common Grasses As Alternative Energy Sources In Broiler Diet". Repository.mouau.edu.ng, Repository.mouau.edu.ng, 18 Mar. 2022. Web. 26 Nov. 2022. < https://repository.mouau.edu.ng/work/view/nutritional-evaluation-of-three-common-grasses-as-alternative-energy-sources-in-broiler-diet-7-2 >.

Chicago

HELEN, OKEREKE. "Nutritional Evaluation Of Three Common Grasses As Alternative Energy Sources In Broiler Diet" Repository.mouau.edu.ng (2022). Accessed 26 Nov. 2022. https://repository.mouau.edu.ng/work/view/nutritional-evaluation-of-three-common-grasses-as-alternative-energy-sources-in-broiler-diet-7-2

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